Posts byAlfonso Garza

Alfonso Garza (Mexico, 1992) graduated in BSc Economics in the University of Amsterdam. He is currently working on a MA Latin American Studies degree in CEDLA, UvA.

Peru’s Political Uncertainty

The country's current political crisis has left Peruvians with a conflict between the executive and legislative powers.

Odebrecht S.A. is a Brazilian construction firm well known to have corrupted and manipulated several government officials across Latin America. Ever since these illegal operations came to light, dozens of politicians have been prosecuted and detained all over the world. Peru was no exception to these countries and the officials found guilty are now facing
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The Rich vs. the Poor

A Brief Analysis about Mexico's Polarized Society.

Classism: (noun) Prejudice against people belonging to a particular social class. (Oxford Dictionary)                                                                                     
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A New Bridge Between Two Oceans

History of the success of the Panama Canal.

During the 15th century, the Spanish caravelas required an alternative route towards its colonies in Peru. The usual trip would go around Cape Horn, surrounding the South American continent, only to follow north once the Pacific Ocean had been reached at the very bottom of Chile. The trip was not only long but also expensive.
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Malvinas or Falklands?

The economic importance of the Islands

Fernando de Magallanes would have never imagined that his explorations would lead to one of the most disputed diplomatic conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries. He was selected by King Charles I of Spain to discover a new commercial route from the Kingdom of Castilla to the Maluku Islands (Indonesia) passing through the South
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How Did Latin America Fall Behind?

What are the main reason of the diverse economic paths of the American Hemisphere?

There are different theories that try to explain the reasons of the contrast of economic development in the colonized countries. It is widely believed that it is fair to assume an equivalent rate of economic growth in countries that were colonized and later emancipated within the same periods of time, especially if those countries also
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2018: A major hit to democracy in Latin America

A brief analysis of the 2018 democratic elections of four Latin American nations.

In this year, democracy will once again be challenged in Latin America. Six different countries will hold presidential elections, and more than ten will celebrate parliamentary ones. The latter will have macroeconomic consequences for the development of the region. Investors expect a massive shift in financial markets…again. Political transitions are considered large economic drivers in
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Chiquita not so chiquita

How bananas shifted international trade

For humankind, basic resources have always been a reason to begin conflicts. Take the example of agriculture; since its discovery, ancient human tribes fought each other for the most fertile piece of land. The deadly diamonds market has split apart entire countries in Africa resulting in the creation of criminal self-defense groups that have threatened
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